Monthly Archives: July 2013

Funny Advocacy

Please check out the Satire to Destress page. There are some great videos.

I think one of the best ways to get out a message is through laughs and eye-catching entertainment. And feel free to spread the joy.

You’ve Got to be Kidding!?

simpsons_edprioritiesApparently, Aaron Osmond, Utah State Senator has the nerve to try to end mandatory education in his state. C’mon! Realistically, how is that supposed to work? And MORE importantly why would you be so greedy to deprive children of such a gift and the right to enrich themselves so they can make something of their lives.

It is attitudes like Osmond’s that seep throughout all levels of education and create the impression that the education of our future generations should be equated to soiled toilet paper ready to be flushed, ignored, unimportant, and abused. No wonder our students are being treated so poorly. In terms of the student debt crisis even banks are treated more fairly and with more dignity than students. 

Osmond has the gall to basically spit on the roll of our magnificent educators.  “The Huffington Post” reported that Osmond’s blog said “…mandatory education in the state has forced teachers and schools to take on parenting responsibilities.” It appears as if Osmond has not heard of the concept “It takes a village to raise a child.” Schools do not replace parents and families; Schools compliment and support families. School is a place to provide additional role models for our children.

Schools are a key piece of the loving community that helps care for, inspire, and nurture our children.  Everyone has the same goals, because when our children succeed, we all succeed. We all want them to have the best lives in the now and for their futures. I have worked with children for over 10 years. I can tell you from personal experiences and from my peers who work with children, and from the vast amount of teachers and educators of all sorts I have spoken with; that one of the best parts of teaching is that moment the child grasps the concept and puts it into action with the greatest grin of glee on their face.

Parents need to work to provide for their families. Not all can just drop everything or afford to learn how to be the most effective full-time home-school academic teacher that will be recognized as effective. People devote their lives and education to provide the best learning experiences and environments for our children. Yes, parents do teach their children a great many things, but not in the same capacity as school teachers.

AND schools work extremely hard to engage parents and the community all the time. We should not underestimate the passion of Parent Teacher Associations (PTAs), parent volunteers, community organizations like Big Brothers & Big Sisters, and all the concerned parents and citizens who show up to Board of Education Meetings. In addition to their proactive outreach, they take into consideration unlike Osmond the economic climate we have been experiencing. Many parents have 2-3 jobs and are lucky if they can help their child with homework or put them to bed at night. Schools, teachers, after school programs, etc… are key and are the soul of ensuring our children grow up in a safe and enriching environment with their peers, are healthy, and have all the skills they need to face the world.

Of course, Osmond’s blog delved even further into the gross void that unduly demeans our education system: “…our teachers and schools have been forced to become surrogate parents, expected to do everything from behavioral counseling, to providing adequate nutrition, to teaching sex education, as well as ensuring full college and career readiness.” No one is forcing our teachers to do anything. Teachers want to help, not only is it their job, it is their desire. Osmond’s statements seem to be designed to have schools helpless. Are you kidding me!? One of my favorite quotes from The West Wing is that “Schools should be palaces…” It is fantastic that schools are providing these services. Not only should schools continue, but they should be doing even more. 

Since apparently Osmond thinks education should be reduced...

Since apparently Osmond thinks education should be reduced…

I can’t believe he attacked the nutrition programs! I was one of those children who benefited. Some children may not have been able to have as good of a lunch for whatever reason and nutrition is key in development and learning. Yes, it would be great if all parents could provide their children everything along with the everything that schools can offer, but that is not how the world works. So we should not just say to bad and let the child suffer. No way! We should commend, award, and have standing ovations who are making our world a better place one child at a time. 😀

This should not be a discussion about removing mandatory education, but should rather be a discussion presenting the proposal to ensure education by securing as a Constitutionally protected right, if not also equally protected at the state level. Even the “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” recognizes education as a human right. Whether you are a fan of public, private, charter, home, internet, etc… in the end the mandatory providence is what counts, because the children deserve it. Denying them this precious right is as if you are persecuting them because they cannot vote yet, stamping on dreams yet to be formed, enacting a form of oppression; and suffocating future opportunity.  And under any circumstance, students 100% have the right to an equal education and equal access to education.

Throughout history education has been a consistent factor in making people’s lives better. Those who have not been educated are usually left ignorant, in the dark, and have little to no means to move forward with their lives. Education exposes our youth to the wonders of the world. For example, one of the key skills children learn through the current education system (mandatory K-most of high school) is how to read – which is used for everything. Reading because of our education system acts like a passport to the child, opportunities galore, and brings immense joy and open discussions and new horizons we can and have yet to imagine.

The only good things that appear to have come from Osmond are his call for [even] more participation among parents and for there to be greater funding for education.

Apparently, Aaron Osmond, Utah State Senator has the nerve to try to end mandatory education in his state. C’mon! Realistically, how is that supposed to work? And MORE importantly why would you be so greedy to deprive children of such a gift and the right to enrich themselves so they can make something of their lives.

It is attitudes like Osmond’s that seep throughout all levels of education and create the impression that the education of our future generations should be equated to soiled toilet paper ready to be flushed, ignored, unimportant, and abused. No wonder our students are being treated so poorly. In terms of the student debt crisis even banks are treated more fairly and with more dignity than students. 

Osmond has the gall to basically spit on the roll of our magnificent educators.  “The Huffington Post” reported that Osmond’s blog said “…mandatory education in the state has forced teachers and schools to take on parenting responsibilities.” It appears as if Osmond has not heard of the concept “It takes a village to raise a child.” Schools do not replace parents and families; Schools compliment and support families. School is a place to provide additional role models for our children.

Schools are a key piece of the loving community that helps care for, inspire, and nurture our children.  Everyone has the same goals, because when our children succeed, we all succeed. We all want them to have the best lives in the now and for their futures. I have worked with children for over 10 years. I can tell you from personal experiences and from my peers who work with children, and from the vast amount of teachers and educators of all sorts I have spoken with; that one of the best parts of teaching is that moment the child grasps the concept and puts it into action with the greatest grin of glee on their face.

Parents need to work to provide for their families. Not all can just drop everything or afford to learn how to be the most effective full-time home-school academic teacher that will be recognized as effective. People devote their lives and education to provide the best learning experiences and environments for our children. Yes, parents do teach their children a great many things, but not in the same capacity as school teachers.

AND schools work extremely hard to engage parents and the community all the time. We should not underestimate the passion of Parent Teacher Associations (PTAs), parent volunteers, community organizations like Big Brothers & Big Sisters, and all the concerned parents and citizens who show up to Board of Education Meetings. In addition to their proactive outreach, they take into consideration unlike Osmond the economic climate we have been experiencing. Many parents have 2-3 jobs and are lucky if they can help their child with homework or put them to bed at night. Schools, teachers, after school programs, etc… are key and are the soul of ensuring our children grow up in a safe and enriching environment with their peers, are healthy, and have all the skills they need to face the world.

Of course, Osmond’s blog delved even further into the gross void that unduly demeans our education system: “…our teachers and schools have been forced to become surrogate parents, expected to do everything from behavioral counseling, to providing adequate nutrition, to teaching sex education, as well as ensuring full college and career readiness.” No one is forcing our teachers to do anything. Teachers want to help, not only is it their job, it is their desire. Osmond’s statements seem to be designed to have schools helpless. Are you kidding me!? One of my favorite quotes from The West Wing is that “Schools should be palaces…” It is fantastic that schools are providing these services. Not only should schools continue, but they should be doing even more. I can’t believe he attacked the nutrition programs! I was one of those children who benefited. Some children may not have been able to have as good of a lunch for whatever reason and nutrition is key in development and learning. Yes, it would be great if all parents could provide their children everything along with the everything that schools can offer, but that is not how the world works. So we should not just say to bad and let the child suffer. No way! We should commend, award, and have standing ovations who are making our world a better place one child at a time. 😀

Making the Job Search Legend-wait for it – dary!

If only it were as easy as Barney makes it out to be. A more substantive post will be added tomorrow and more is to come on ways to stand out in the job searching process – perhaps in an innovative way like on How I Met Your Mother. But this post is for all those proactive job seekers to get a nice laugh and to say do not give up hope. The best we can do at this point into new policy and reforms are made is to keep trying. Because like voting, if we do not take action,  our voice has little meaning.

Here is an awesome inspirational networking success story I came across today. I know that networking can be daunting sometimes, but stories like this make it seem worthwhile and to just go for it. Worst situation, you meet awesome people, which for “the worst situation” is kind of amazing and not really “the worst” at all.

http://solopracticeuniversity.com/2013/07/15/case-study-networking-in-action-for-the-new-solo-lawyer/?goback=%2Egde_152979_member_258119615

Staying Afloat

We all know that ancient Chinese teaching a man to fish proverb:

“Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.”

Well here’s the modern take on it for recent grads:

“You give a student a loan today and s/he can pay for college.

After they graduate they will be paying back that loan for a great portion of the rest of their life – maybe…”

A huge looming question is how is this generation of young adults going to pay this back? So, let’s break it down.

 

Below are approximations of living costs for grads that either try to immediately enter the workforce or are no longer eligible for deferment for whatever reason.

You will see that many will barely stay afloat.

Most young adults are either unemployed or have some sort of minimum wage/part-time job [IF they are lucky] that has nothing to do with their degree (the very reason they took the loans out in the first place).

 

So, let’s say the minimum wage is $7.50

And the recent college grad gets a minimum wage job that lets them work 40 hours a week [please keep in mind that they are not necessarily getting direct job experience in their field unless they studied business and minus developing people and communications skills.)

 

Their Total $ earned per month = $1200 (gross income)

Approximate Monthly Cost of Living

Loan Payment (Based on one of the offered payment plans): $400 a month for the next approximate 10 years (if you pay on time)

Rent (if they are not w/parents or crashing or couch surfing) – about $700 a month

Utilities: (water, electric, internet, laundry, kitchen and bathroom appliances (soap, shampoo, toilet paper, paper towels) $150 a month

Cell phone: (Needed for potential job apps/interviews, networking, keeping in touch w/ family/friends, and for emergencies) $30 – $50 (using the $30 for the total below)

Food: $150 a month

Public Transportation (cause can’t afford a car or insurance: $200+  per month

Fun (subjective activities): [You can’t be expected to have no funds for fun you’d go crazy –  it’s for mental health]: $100 per month

Emergency Funds (even if you are one of the lucky ones and have additional savings it is always safe to have some extra money just in case you never know): $200

Total Monthly Spending: $1780

 

$1200 (gross income) – $1780 (Total Money $ Spent) = -$580 (net income)

Even if the monthly loan payment was removed, the recent grad would STILL be in debt for the month.

$1200 (gross income) – $1780 (Total Money $ Spent) = -$580 (net income) + $400

= -$180

So, after calculating the potential under-budgeting we try to think what can we cut back on?

First, please add the loan payment back in because (you SHOULD pay it – if you don’t it’s terrible for your credit, credit is VERY important). So we are back at -$580.

Then we look at cutting out components that “may” be debatable such as:

– Cell phone: +30

– Fun (subjective activities): +100

– Internet part of utilities: +50

– Some food: +50

– And some Emergency funds (which is not a great idea): +100

Total New Additions: +330

-$580 + $300 = -$250

– The recent grad will be STILL be under budget by $250

Another option is moving back in with their parents or maybe a friend/other relative has space.

– If they live at home, then they can potentially save on rent and utilities.

+$700: Rent

+ 150: Utilities

Total savings = $850

So based on the previous component cuts…

-$250 + $850 = $600

Finally, they are not under budget and perhaps they can either save the $600 or reallocate it to paying their cell phone and internet bill for basic communication and job hunting or whatever they’d like.

Almost everything listed in the “Approximate Monthly Cost of Living” below is necessary and explains why so many more people live with their parents today (and are now being dubbed the “boomerang generation”). It’s not necessarily about being lazy; it’s about what they can afford, keeping up with loans, and trying not to become homeless.

This is a scary reality. Taxes, health insurance (a whole separate debate), printing costs for resumes, new clothes when old clothes get worn out were not even included for all of the estimations.

Another option to cope with the budgeting issue is having multiple jobs or praying your boss will give you over time or more hours. But if both pay around minimum wage, in order to minimally get around $1800 a month to be able to afford the $1780 monthly approximate cost of living evaluation; the recent grad would have to work 60 hours between the two minimum wage jobs.

These are jobs the recent grad probably doesn’t love, that underutilized their skill set, and will not help advance their chosen career path. These young adults are basically living pay check to pay check.

60 hours is a lot to work, which can be exhausting a terrible for your health [maybe they should pulling all-nighters from college to their resume]. It is possible, for example doctors and lawyers work at least that amount, but they get paid a whole lot more than minimum wage.

Do we really expect our recent grads to sacrifice, food or shelter to pay back loans and just to get by? Or their ability to get a job to get them out of their unemployment hole? I hope not.

I think better options include making college more affordable, not doubling student interest loan rates, and finding new ways to handle current and future student debt (which will certainly be discussed in greater depth in an upcoming post)

Walk the Plank!

Walking the Plank

You’ll either survive or you won’t.

OR

Perhaps you’ll make it eventually.

But how long will that take?

How much does your degree really matter or truly prepare

You for the sea of resumes that are about to swallow you whole

suffocating you and dragging you down into the depths that we call

the job market – the real world.

Once you are in the sea, will you be able to get back on the ship
or find an inhabited thriving island [of employment] to be on more stable ground?

OR will you be stranded on the deserted island of a minimum wage job, temp job {IF you are semi-lucky}, or yet another unpaid internship. How long can that last?

How can you stick out in the white foamy watery sea of resumes and survive?

Will you jump in or be pushed?  BUT will you be prepared either way?

In the sickening storm that is The United States’ recession, unemployment is dangerously high and so is the ability for young adults to find jobs to make a basic living. Recent graduates – our up and coming workforce is suffering.

And with the incredulous cost of getting a college degree, grads drowning in loans, interest rates spiking, competing with stronger swimmers with higher degrees and vast more years of experience; the future looks grim.

This blog will discuss the ever-expanding ongoing employment crisis – particularly how it affects young adults. These issues include the barriers in the job market for those entering the market; the dilemma of getting intriguing unpaid, but valuable experience v. minimum wage/job searching [what I call the never-ending intern]; college costs; paying back loans; and trying to find ways & new policy solutions to make this wave of highly motivated creative, and qualified individuals more employable; finally looking at job search tips (like ways to network) to help maneuver around our troubled system in the best ways we can.

So YES, the job market is like walking the plank. I don’t know about you, but I intend to survive, even if it takes one blog post at a time.

(This is the first post and is also available on the “About” page)

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